SEARCH
Filter by:
Audio
Video

 

Military History

The Briscoe Center has constituted a prime source for military history since its founding. Its earliest collections document military affairs of the Spanish, Mexicans, Indians, and Anglo Americans in the Southwest in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. All together, the Center's resources embrace more than three-hundred years of military affairs, including many aspects of America's involvement in foreign wars, from Mexico to Iraq.

Recently, the Center has deepened its commitment to the field. Building on its experience as joint sponsor of a World War II scholar program since 1998, the Center now has established the Institute for the Study of American Military History, an educational outreach, research, and archival program.

Order by
 
Billy Yank and Johnny Reb
Source:KLRU-TEMP Video Collection
Drawing upon an unparalleled knowledge of the soldier in the ranks, both North and South, Professor Wiley gives us a composite picture of the fighting man of the Civil War. With numerous anecdotes and extracts from contemporary letters, Wiley brings to life the individual men of the Blue and Gray. In doing so, Professor Wiley not only gives flesh and emotions to a great event in our history, but also provides valuable insight into American society of the mid-nineteenth century. Professor Wiley notes at the outset that Northern and Southern soldiers had much more in common than in opposition. Yet the differences between them are instructive as to the social systems of their respective sections. For example, the observation that Northern soldiers were better educated while Southern soldiers were more prone to religious revivalism tells us much about their respective social institutions. Perhaps Wiley's most useful contribution is to give us an idea of what the Civil War was all about from the point of view of those who fought it. [Synopsis from "The History of American Civilization By Its Interpreters; A Student Guide to the Television Series" by James A. Bonar, Roger E. Willson, and The University of the State of New York] Tape is dated 1974/11/12, indicating that it is a dub of an earlier recording.
Flag Day
Source:Brooks (Jack B.) Papers
Produced film documenting Flag Day ceremonies at the House of Representatives, with a speech by Jack Brooks, and a presentation dramatizing the history of the U.S. Flag in Pensacola, Florida. Color picture with sound.
Gonzales Report [Guantanamo Bay Naval Base]
Source:Gonzalez (Henry B.) Collection
Weekly public address from Congressman Henry B. Gonzalez to his constituents in Bexar County, Texas. Presented as the second in a series of three, with continued discussion on "the cuban situation." Gonzalez states that the base has recently become an emotionally charged issue and provides an overview of the base and its history, emphasizing that the 1934 treaty gives the U.S. the right to use the base. He also talks about the implausibility of Cuba attacking the base. Black and white picture with sound. Leader reads, "Gonzales-705, 185-12 (English)."
Gonzales Report [Renegotiation Board; Viet Cong Flag Ban]
Source:Gonzalez (Henry B.) Collection
Weekly public address from Congressman Henry B. Gonzalez to his constituents in Bexar County, Texas. Comments on a conference report for the daylight savings time bill, extending and strengthening the Contract Renegotiation Board (formerly known as the War Production Board) to avoid profiteering during the Vietnam War, and a future program idea for grants and aid in India proposed by Lyndon Johnson after meeting with Indira Gandhi. Gonzalez talks about applying a similar program to Latin American countries, and also talks about investigating the feasibility of a bill to outlaw the use of the Viet Cong flag in demonstrations in the United States. Has opening with Gonzales climbing the steps of the U.S. Capitol Building while the sounds of the Bells of Congress are heard. Black and white picture with sound. Writing on leader reads "O/C, 11."
Gonzales Report [Vietnam; Easter Sunday]
Source:Gonzalez (Henry B.) Collection
Weekly public address from Congressman Henry B. Gonzalez to his constituents in Bexar County, Texas. After talking about Easter, the beauty of Southwest Texas and an appropriation bill for armed services, Gonzalez spends the rest of the program covering the Vietnam conflict, saying, "...The war in Vietnam is one of the most confusing, one of the most puzzling, one of the most enigmatic and difficult to understand situations in the history of the country...It boils down to the essential question of having faith and trust in the sincerity and the devotion and the patriotism of the national leaders." He also talks about the changing role of the U.S. as a world leader, highlights that World War II never formally ended, questions the labeling of wars as big or small and mentions recording four programs discussing Vietnam more than two years previous [1964-1965]. Gonzalez acknowledges WOAI-TV, KENS-TV and KWEX-TV for providing airtime, and mentions a remaining San Antonio VHF station [KONO-TV?] that does not provide airtime for his weekly reports. Black and white picture with sound.
Gonzales Report [Vietnam; HemisFair Groundbreaking]
Source:Gonzalez (Henry B.) Collection
Weekly public address from Congressman Henry B. Gonzalez to his constituents in Bexar County, Texas. Gonzalez begins the program talking about the significance of a HemisFair federal pavilion groundbreaking ceremony from the prior week, positing that "It may be the one thing that can anchor the breakthrough that we must make in coexisting in the western hemisphere with the nations that destiny has placed along our side." The rest of the program is presented as a continuation of his discussion on the conflict in Vietnam. He speaks on the problem of close-minded American critics, suggesting they may have a self-defeating psychological bias against the country. He emphasizes that "no man in his right mind seeks or desires war", but that "we may not seek a fight, we may not want a war, but we may have one thrust upon us," quoting from Hilaire Belloc's poem "The Pacifist" to back his point. On the president's leadership he says, "There are those who distrust the president. There are those who hate him. There are those who question his motives. I am not one of those." He also makes the claim that only one in ten soldiers sent to Vietnam are exposed to combat. Gonzalez acknowledges WOAI-TV, KENS-TV and KWEX-TV for providing airtime, and mentions that WOAI and KENS sometimes allow him to record his program in San Antonio. He also mentions a remaining San Antonio VHF station [KONO-TV?] that does not provide airtime for his weekly reports. Black and white picture with sound. Leader reads, "2316 Gonzalez, 14, 60."
Gonzales Report [Vietnam]
Source:Gonzalez (Henry B.) Collection
Weekly public address from Congressman Henry B. Gonzalez to his constituents in Bexar County, Texas. This episode focuses almost entirely on the escalating Vietnam conflict. Advocates tolerance for dissent, comparing to demonstrations in the lead-up to World War II and mentioning the Veterans of Future Wars. Frames his support of the war as faith in President Lyndon Johnson and the national leadership. Has opening with Gonzales climbing the steps of the U.S. Capitol Building while the sounds of the Bells of Congress are heard. Black and white picture with sound. Writing on leader reads "O/C, L-11."
The Common Soldiers of the Confederacy - North and South
Source:KLRU-TEMP Video Collection
Professor Wiley, a noted Civil War scholar and author, has always been more interested in what he calls the plain people than in the leaders, the generals, or the politicians. Here he gives an informative and fascinating picture of the average Confederate soldier whose courage and fighting qualities sustained the South against great odds for four bloody years. Professor Wiley has read thousands of letters and diaries written by "Johnny Reb," and he uses quotations from many of them to describe in human terms what is all too often presented in abstract numbers. Thus we learn just who the men in gray were, what their backgrounds were and how old they were, what their uniforms were like and what they had to eat, their feelings of loneliness and their attitude of "Billy Yank," and their heroism--and fear--in battle. Through Professor Wiley's lively description, the impersonal armies of the South become peopled by colorful, often humorous, often courageous, and always human creatures. [Synopsis from "The History of American Civilization By Its Interpreters; A Student Guide to the Television Series" by James A. Bonar, Roger E. Willson, and The University of the State of New York] Tape is dated 1974/10/28, indicating that it is a dub of an earlier recording.
The Mercury Project “Space”
Source:Brooks (Jack B.) Papers
Program on developments in Project Mercury, and problems of space travel for human beings, featuring an interview with Dr. and Navy Captain Charles F. Gell, of the Navy Medical Core and Special Assistance for Medical and Allied Sciences, Office of Naval Research. Features space suit, scale models, and photos of astronaut training. Black and white picture with sound. Eastman Kodak edge code reads "circle circle," which correlates to 1959. Writing on leader reads, "1690 Brooks 13-175."